In Pursuit Of African Music Cds & Vinyl

The English gentleman there explained that, unfortunately, they now only sell on-line. Id also caught wind of a New Jersey branch of Sterns here in the US, and reached out to them, only to the same response. After a few more calls and conversations, I found my destination. First I would head to Los Angeles, California to Amoeba Music ,probably the only mega-music store remaining in the US, and browse their African music section to see if they had anything of interest. Second, I would make plans to travel to Africa later in 2012 or early 2013 for recordings of local contemporary music. Sterns suggested a trip to South Africa, as the formidable Gallo Record Company still owns over 75% of recordings ever made in South Africa. Fortuitously, I had already made arrangements to attend a friends wedding in San Diego, California when I learned about Amoeba Music, so I quickly changed my plans to include a short trip to Los Angeles. I just returned yesterday, and wanted to report my findings with a live video of my travels to the place, and a brief summary of what I discovered.
For more information, visit http://blogs.voanews.com/african-music-treasures/2012/07/26/in-pursuit-of-african-music-cds-vinyl/

Nigerian start-up taking on mobile music

MyMusic is aiming to corner the mobile music market in the West African nation of Nigeria (image: MyMusic)

MyMusic has an impressive collection of songs, but the co-founder was quick to add that a lot more work lies ahead for the start-up. What happens with most of these international sites is that they have a structured system where they can just go meet a record label and automatically get about maybe 100,000 songs, or as much as possible but in Nigeria, the structure is still growing. The goal now is to have a wide variety. So from the up-and-coming artists to music of like 20 years ago or 30 years ago. As with most African nations, bandwidth is always an issue, and Taiwo said that they have taken that into consideration by building very lean sites for users. Within two clicks you can download a song, so were trying to overcome that challenge, he added.
For more information, visit http://www.itnewsafrica.com/2013/11/nigerian-start-up-taking-on-mobile-music/

Jazz Mecca Returning To Bay Area?

The Miami Beach Jazz Festival amplifies local scene

One of the year’s most memorable jazz events — ask anyone who was there — happened in August at Cafe Stritch when Turre performed with his band for three nights. He paid tribute to an early mentor, the late saxophonist Rahsaan Roland Kirk, and the music reached Kirk-ian heights: a combination of church, house party and cosmic adventure. Night to night, the crowds grew. Still, not everyone feels the jazz scene is reaching a new critical mass: “I love what SFJazz is trying to do, and I feel like these other places are kind of picking up the slack,” says saxophonist Howard Wiley, who was in Turre’s band. “But I also remember, maybe ten years ago or even less, that just about anybody I wanted to see would come in for a week at Yoshi’s” in Oakland, where jazz bookings have been drastically scaled back.
For more information, visit http://www.mercurynews.com/music/ci_24623674/jazz-mecca-returning-bay-area

Both the Max Holm Quartet and the Jahzel Dotel Quartet paid homage to the early pioneers of jazz music , most notably Duke Ellington, keeping in line with the mission of the competition to preserve the importance of jazz culture. The evening began to mellow out midway with the duo, better known as Joe Carter and Ali Ryerson. As compared to the previous acts, the duo kept it light with a one-note samba, and some melodic, slow tempo jazz. Ryerson made it personal by recreating jazz pianist Bill Evans We Will Meet Again, as a dedication to her older brother who inspired her musical career. After the duo took everything down a notch, Austrian pianist, composer, and artistic director of the festival, Markus Gottschlich teamed up with Grammy Award-Winning violinist Mads Tolling, as well as Jeff Carswell on bass and Jose Javier Friere on drums, maintained a smooth low tempo throughout the majority of their set. The high point certainly rested on their closing song, which, as per Gottschlichs verbal dedication to his father, used folk to represent a beautiful forest and the sentimental mood associated with such an experience.
For more information, visit http://www.examiner.com/review/the-miami-beach-jazz-festival-amplifies-local-scene

Joe Mullins Brings Bluegrass To Mountaineer Opry

Thanks for supporting Bluegrass for Hospice

30., has been in the music business since he was a kid. Mullins’ father, Paul “Moon” Mullins, was a prominent bluegrass musician whose time spent as a legendary radio DJ influenced his son to buy and run a four-station radio network. Currently heard on the airwaves in southern Ohio, the network can also be heard online at myclasssiccountry.com where the music ranges from bluegrass music to gospel to old school real country hits. Mullins also fronts the award-winning bluegrass band Joe Mullins and the Radio Ramblers. The group is on a roll with a series of new and powerful bluegrass albums released on the Rebel Records label over the last few years. Because of Mullins’ long-time standing in the bluegrass community, he is on the forefront of keeping the genre alive and healthy.
For more information, visit http://www.herald-dispatch.com/features/x1584262971/Joe-Mullins-brings-bluegrass-to-Mountaineer-Opry

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For more information, visit http://www.gazette.net/article/20131129/OPINION/131129060/1084/OPINION/article/20131129/OPINION/131129060/1084/thanks-for-supporting-bluegrass-for-hospice&template=southernMaryland

Bluegrass vs. old-time music: A primer

Staff writer Stacy Chandler RALEIGH Its common to see bluegrass and old-time used as almost interchangeable labels, especially in the years since roots music went mainstream with the chart-topping soundtrack to 2000s O Brother, Where Art Thou? But while the styles are closely related and have similar instrumentation, bluegrass and old-time are not the same. While this is a gross over-simplification, here are the two quickest ways to tell whether a band is bluegrass or old-time: Type of banjo In old-time, its typically an open-back model. Bluegrass banjo has a resonator and is louder. Solos Everyone just plays the song straight on through in old-time, which rarely has individual solos. In bluegrass, there are breaks, interludes in which each instrumentalist takes a lead solo while the rest of the players stick to the main melody. Beyond those generalizations, you could do a lot worse than to ask local musician Joe Newberry (who has been known to play both bluegrass and old-time) to break it down. Bluegrass and old-time are vines from the same root, says Newberry, who won an International Bluegrass Music Association award in 2012 and is nominated again this year.
For more information, visit http://www.newsobserver.com/2013/09/23/3222312/bluegrass-vs-old-time-music-a.html

Education Bosses Hit Out At Ofsted Over Music Lessons

Music Education In Public Schools Gets A Passing Grade

It comes a year after music support services in England were reorganised into hubs under the Governments music plan. But John Clemson, head of the music service for Services for Education, a charitable company which sells a range of services directly to schools in Birmingham, said the report placed too much importance on the school curriculum at the expense of other musical activities. I think the way the Ofsted report was presented was rather unfair, he said. There was a strong focus on delivering music within the school curriculum, which isnt a core role of the hubs, so it feels a bit like the goal posts have been moved. There is so much going on in Birmingham and we dont recognise a lot of the negative findings here.
For more information, visit http://www.birminghammail.co.uk/lifestyle/education-bosses-hit-out-ofsted-6351520

“What the data isn’t telling you is that you can have schools where there is one music teacher and 1000 students. Some of those students are going to get music and some of those students aren’t.” There’s some evidence in the DOE study to suggest the impossibly large student/teacher ratios Kessler describes, but you really have to hunt for it. Take Table 70, one of 165 supplemental tables : it shows that only 81% of secondary schools with an enrollment under 500 offer music as compared to 98% of secondary schools with a thousand students or more. Coincidence? I think not.
For more information, visit http://www.npr.org/blogs/therecord/2012/04/06/150133858/music-education-in-public-schools-gets-a-passing-grade

Flamenco Singer, Jafelin, Sings Latin Jazz Boleros

Jafelin is one of Canada’s preeminent flamenco singers and has added Boleros and Latin Jazz to her repertoire. The Venezuelan born singer has made her home in the Vancouver, Canada since 1996. Since applying her talents to the art of flamenco music, she has become a regular favorite performing three or four times a week. “I’ve been surrounded with Spanish influences all my life,” says Jafelin. When asked why she chose to sing Boleros, she says, “I was always intrigued with Spanish coplas (songs). I grew up with them.
For more information, visit http://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwmusic/article/Flamenco-Singer-Jafelin-Sings-Latin-Jazz-Boleros-20131128

When I Think Of Music, Only Folk Music Appeals To Me: Falguni Pathak

Folk songs have larger appeal: Falguni Pathak

The Navratri festival, which goes on for nine days, concluded recently. It was a busy time for Pathak as she was booked to regale dandiya enthusiasts by performing at the Police Parade Grounds in Ghatkopar, Mumbai. The show was organised by event organising company Mangal Entertainment Private Ltd. The singer ruled the pop music scene with her tracks like “Yaad piya ki aane lagi”, “Maine payal hai chhankai”, “Meri chunnar udh udh jaaye” and “Odhani”. She credits team work for helping her with the success of her songs. “Actually it has been always team work. My music director always felt that my voice was like that of a teenager, so I sang all those songs,” said Pathak.
For more information, visit http://ibnlive.in.com/news/when-i-think-of-music-only-folk-music-appeals-to-me-falguni-pathak/429624-45-75.html

Folk Alley Presents: Mandolin Orange

But what makes this Mandolin Orange tune so enchanting is its effortlessness. The words seem to fall right into one another, like cheery drunks into so many bar stools. Mandolinist Andrew Marlin wrote this song during a road trip with his friend. They thought it might be fun to write a stereotypical country song and didn’t expect for it to be so catchy. But as often happens when you stop thinking so hard about something and just do it for fun, the result was memorable, and lent itself beautifully to harmony from Andrew’s musical partner, Emily Frantz. Recorded in Saranac Lake, N.Y., in late October, the song took on a particularly autumnal vibe.
For more information, visit http://www.npr.org/event/music/246960980/folk-alley-presents-mandolin-orange

folk music

The countrys mainstream music hasnt been this newsworthy since a-ha conquered… Roy Harper, Royal Festival Hall Wednesday, 23 October 2013 It had to finish with When an Old Cricketer Leaves the Crease, the commentary on a building block of British life which marks the passing of time more acutely than anything explicitly counting the minutes which precede leaving the field, whether… theartsdesk Q&A: Singer Linda Thompson Sunday, 20 October 2013 Linda Thompson, one of Britain’s great living singers, has just released her third solo album since her return to recording with 2001’s Fashionably Late.Talking in her London home before travelling to the US, she opens up about her latest record, It… LFF 2013: Inside Llewyn Davis Tuesday, 15 October 2013 Showbiz is a cruel and mysterious cosmic code that can grind the artist down, before he comes close to cracking it. Thats the message behind the Coen brothers elegy to the Greenwich Village folk scene of 1961. Llewyn Davis (Oscar Isaac) stands…
For more information, visit http://www.theartsdesk.com/topics/folk-music

An Early Gift From The Martha’s Vineyard Chamber Music Society

Ms. Chase’s recording of the Beethoven Violin Concerto (Call Records) was hailed as “one of the 20 most outstanding performances of the work’s recorded history,” and she was among very few musicians who were invited to play for the rescue and recovery workers following the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City. A frequent performer with MVCMS, violinist Scott Woolweaver has premiered many new works, including pieces written especially for him. Since 1980 he has been a member of Alea III, a contemporary music ensemble in residence at Boston University. Cellist Scott Kluksdahl has been described by Strings Magazine as, “a simply superb cellist, playing with consummate technical ease, a beautiful sound, total conviction, authority and dedication to the music.” Mr. Kluksdahl has appeared as an orchestral soloist, recitalist, and chamber musician throughout the United States, Europe, Latin America, and Israel. MVCMS co-founder and artistic director Delores Stevens will, as always, accompany the musicians on piano in a program that includes duets, trios, one solo, and one ensemble piece.
For more information, visit http://www.mvtimes.com/2013/11/26/early-gift-from-marthaaes-vineyard-chamber-music-society-18126/

Music by ‘guerilla composers’ at the Conservatory Brass Chamber Music recital

Mood Swings

Power players: Music director Mischa Santora just announced that this, his 14th season, is his last. Social media handles: @CincyChamberOrc; www.facebook.com/CincinnatiChamberOrchestra Where to see them: Their home is Corbett Theater, School for Creative and Performing Arts, Over-the-Rhine. On Nov. 17, theyll perform at St. Catharine of Siena Church, Westwood. Thom Mariner, executive director: I really think intimacy is one of the key elements in attracting a new audience.
For more information, visit http://news.cincinnati.com/article/20131006/ENT03/310060016/Demystifying-chamber-music

Chamber Music Society concert is Sunday

24, the Concord Chamber Music Society (CCMS) will present its second concert of the 2013-2014 season at Concord Academy. CCMS founder and director Wendy Putnam (violin) will be joined by Concord Chamber players Steve Ansell (viola) and Mike Reynolds (cello), along with guest musicians Julianne Lee (violin) and Cathy Basrak (viola), both from the Boston Symphony Orchestra (BSO). The program includes works by Sibelius, Brahms and Dvorak. Lee joined the BSO in 2006 and currently serves as acting assistant concertmaster. Lee earned a Bachelor of Arts in violin performance and a diploma in viola performance from the Curtis Institute, as well as a Master of Arts from the New England Conservatory. She teaches on the faculty of the NEC preparatory school and at Berklee College of Music. She appears regularly on concert stages as a soloist, chamber musician and orchestral player. Basrak was appointed assistant principal violist of the BSO in 2000. She is a frequent soloist who has performed with major orchestras throughout Europe and North America and has been awarded prizes at leading competitions, including a first prize at the 1995 Irving M. Klein International String Competition; the first violist ever to do so. The program features the Suite in A Major for Violin, Viola and Cello by Jean Sibelius, the String Quintet in F Major, Op. 88 by Johannes Brahms, and the String Quintet in E-Flat Major, Op.
For more information, visit http://www.wickedlocal.com/concord/thisjustin/x140433022/Chamber-Music-Society-concert-is-Sunday

Demystifying chamber music

The piece was a prelude and fugue based on the song Old Friends from Bookends, the 1968 album of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel. As might be guessed, the distinctive opening interval of this song emerged as a key motif, although I had a bit more trouble detecting the essence of the song in the fugal treatment. For me this was a rather engaging bit of nostalgia, leaving me thinking about how the source material predated the composers birth by about two decades. The final selection was De Profundis by Danny Clay, who currently runs the Guerrila Composers Guild with Benavides. It was quickly clear that this music had nothing to do with Psalm 130 or, for that matter, Oscar Wildes letter to Lord Alfred Douglas, which has become a literary classic.
For more information, visit http://www.examiner.com/article/music-by-guerilla-composers-at-the-conservatory-brass-chamber-music-recital

Promoting African Music Collaborations

MUSIC; African Music and African-American Audiences

About the studio What it is. Coke Studio Africa is a music television series produced by the Coca-Cola Company featuring live studio-recorded music performances by various artistes. The music show brings together artistes from different genres, eras and regions to create a modern and authentic sound through musical fusion. Purpose. The purpose of Coke Studio is to reinvent the way music can capture the spirit of a nation, opening hearts and minds, and of course, happiness. Coverage.
For more information, visit http://www.monitor.co.ug/artsculture/Entertainment/Promoting-African-music-collaborations/-/812796/2084794/-/lx5ccv/-/index.html

By and large, African music is not promoted to or through African-American publications and radio stations. On those occasions when African-American audiences have been made aware of performances, they have inevitably responded favorably. There are simply too many similarities in the way people of African descent create and enjoy music to be ignored. Even given the current saturation of black America with music seemingly created with corporate concerns in mind, there are nevertheless many types of African music that appeal to African-American musical sensibilities. The Afrobeat of Fela Anikulapo-Kuti and his son, Femi, recalls funk and hip-hop. The string-based sounds of musicians like Baaba Maal of Senegal and Oumou Sangare and Ali Farka Toure, both of Mali, strike an easy chord with ears attuned to the sound of the blues. The florid singing of female jelis of Mali, Senegal, Gambia and Guinea reminds one of the gospel divas bred in the Baptist church, and the church harmonies of South African isicathamiya groups like Ladysmith Black Mambazo have a resonance similar to that of gospel music.
For more information, visit http://www.nytimes.com/2001/07/08/arts/music-african-music-and-african-american-audiences.html

Thewrap Screening Series: How Belgium Produced The Century’s Second Great Bluegrass Movie (video)

Alan Jackson Unveils ‘Bluegrass Album’ Tunes in Nashville

Maybe the question should be: “O Brother,”Awhat hast thou begat? “‘O Brother Where Art Thou?’Aconquered the world for bluegrass music,” acknowledged the star and co-writer of “Broken Circle,”AJohan Heldenbergh, after a TheWrap’s awards-series screening Monday night at the Landmark. He added that he’d “be very honored” to cross paths with T Bone Burnett, the earlier movie’s music producer, as Burnett touts “Inside Llewyn Davis”Aon the awards circuit this season, “because he was one of the reasons why I started loving bluegrass.” Also read: TheWrap Screening Series: How Oscar Isaac’s Incredible Luck Made Him the Serially Unlucky ‘Llewyn Davis’ But although “Broken Circle Breakdown”Aeven borrows a key song from “O Brother,”Ait’s unlikely anyone will ever program the two films together on a revival-house double bill. In the new movie, Heldenbergh really does portray “a man of constant sorrow.” His character is an American music-loving musician whose seemingly idyllic marriage goes downhill after their daughter contracts cancer. AAlot of narrative time-jumping contrasts the leads’ present-day anguish and arguments with the happier and sexier times when they first fell in love (and lust) Ato the tune of Bill Monroe. The answer to “Will the Circle Be Unbroken?” is a rueful “no,” and if a sadder movie has ever been made, it’s possible no one has survived to tell the tale.
For more information, visit http://movies.msn.com/movies/article.aspx?news=841013

Bluegrass and classical come together with the LMP

on Dec. 3 in the Rathskellar Room of the Colgate Inn. This special concert features bluegrass duo the Hamilton Ramblers and members of the Colgate Chamber Players. Comprised of guitarist John Crespi and mandolinist Dave Folta, the Hamilton Ramblers have graced the LMP stage in the past with their unique mix of bluegrass standards and specialty items. This new collaboration with the Chamber Players gives the duo a chance to flex their muscles on a classical repertoire as they sit in on Beethoven and Vivaldi pieces while the Chamber Players perform Paquito de Rivera and others. The LMP provides a venue where top local amateur musicians can play a full concert for an attentive audience.
For more information, visit http://www.uticaod.com/mid-yorkweekly/x1783720051/Bluegrass-and-classical-come-together-with-the-LMP

Bach, bluegrass, and blues: Savannah Music Festival coming up

soul gospel blues singer Ruthie Foster

But if the 54-year-old country star had his way, this night would have originally come during the Clinton era. Ive been trying to do [a bluegrass album] for 15 years, he said. It just seemed like every time we got in a position to start one, something else came up and it just never worked out. It almost happened in 2006, when he tapped Alison Krauss to produce his 13th studio albumLike Red on a Rose, with the initial intention of it being a bluegrass effort that ultimately went in a different direction. We ended up making an easy-listening mixture of stuff, Jackson recalled. It was a great album, but it didnt go anywhere close to bluegrass. Random Notes: 2013’s Hottest Rock Pics For Jackson, the wait was worth it. It feels like the time was right now, and my head was in the right place for it, to write the songs, he explained. Thats important, asThe Bluegrass Albumis a labor of love, not a vanity project for the singer.I just wanted to make it for me, to show my appreciation for bluegrass.
For more information, visit http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/alan-jackson-unveils-bluegrass-album-tunes-in-nashville-20130828

Heres a taste of whats in store: On the festivals opening night, Georgia based gospel group Sweet Singing Harmony Harmoneers with share the stage with award winning high energy bluegrass group IIIrd Tyme Out, while across town The Takacs Quartet, known for their blend of drama, warmth, and humor in presenting classical music, mark their first appearance at the festival with an evening of works by Beethoven, Schubert, and Bartok. In another venue, banjo master Bela Fleck reunites with his original band mates of twenty years ago, The Flecktones, for a range across musical influences from jazz to blues to world music At eleven oclock on most festival mornings, you can catch top classical music artists in intimate performance at the Trinity United Methodist Church, and then at twelve thirty, have another chance to see roots, jazz and pops performers who headline evening concerts at the Noon30 series at the Charles H. Morris Center You can dance to the zydeco rhythms of Nathan and the Zydeco Cha Chas, and take part in salsa dance party on another night Listen in as in as twelve top high school bands play their hearts out in the Swing Central Jazz Competition, and follow the winners through to an evening concert where they will share the stage with jazz greats including Marcus Roberts and Wycliffe Gordon Hear Texas troubadour Ruthie Foster bring together the fiery roots of soul, gospel, jazz, and blues in her work. Its no accident that her latest album is called Let It Burn. Listen to festival associate musical director and world renown classical violinist Daniel Hope give his first Savannah recital in years Hear Chris Thile, known for his bluegrass music with Nickel Creek and the Punch Brothers, investigate both bluegrass an Bach There is, of course, quite a bit more: more dances, more roots music, more gospel, more jazz, more classical. Theres a strong education component as well, including education events for schoolchildren from the area, jazz mentorships, and in a new program this year, an acoustic music academy for talented string players in which they have the chance to learn from and work with festival artists. Tickets for the concerts are already sale, both in Savannah and through the festivals web site, where there is also detailed information about the artists and the schedule of events.
For more information, visit http://travel.usatoday.com/alliance/destinations/perceptivetravel/post/2012/02/Bach-bluegrass-and-blues-Savannah-Music-Festival-coming-up/634680/1

Music Lessons In Toronto

Music lessons offered on sliding scale

Miranda Synder and Mathew Peters, founders of the non-profit East End Music Project, stand outside a Gerrard Street East cafe with Peters’ daughter Madeleine. Beginning in February, the group will host weekly music lessons for children in kindergarten to Grade 12. PHOTO: Andrew Hudson

Girls aged 8 – 16 can spend a week learning various instruments, playing in a band, writing songs, and performing in a final concert. Plus, programming also touches on zine making, media literacy, and more. It’s a pretty rad, fun way for girls to learn new skills, gain confidence, and make friends who love music as much as they do. More girls in the pit, forever! Just Drums Drums don’t get enough love. This 30 year old family-run business in North York is all about love for drums: they sell drums, they teach drums, and they probably drum on stuff when they’re out running errands.
For more information, visit http://www.blogto.com/music/2013/10/music_lessons_in_toronto/

The school music lessons with no… music: Thousands of classes involve barely a note being played

Practice makes perfect: More schools are failing pupils with music lessons involving very little practical learning

Pupils are given few opportunities to play or listen to music or sing, they found. Practice makes perfect: More schools are failing pupils with music lessons involving very little practical learning Put simply, in too many cases there was not enough music in music lessons, the report said. In many instances there was insufficient emphasis on active music-making or on the use of musical sound as the dominant language of learning. Too much use was made of verbal communication and non-musical activities. Inspectors observed music lessons 184 primary, secondary and special schools. Girl, 11, raped by schoolboy street gang members in McDonald’s restaurant toilet They found that standards had barely improved since the last inspection of music provision three years ago. Nearly two thirds of schools were failing to provide a good standard of music education – and lessons in one in five were inadequate.
For more information, visit http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2109034/The-school-music-lessons-music.html

A professional guitarist with a teaching studio at Yonge and Eglinton for 13 years, Peters said he was looking for a change after he and his family moved to East Danforth two years ago. I wanted something that would allow me to give back a little. By chance, when Peters pitched the idea to his friend and former bandmate Miranda Snyder, she had just finished doing a World Vision survey of community programs in east Toronto. Looking at the neighbourhoods between Donlands and Barrington, Cosburn and Gerrard, Snyder found a real mix of incomes. Many people, including families new to Canada, live below the poverty line, she said. But others are moving east to buy their first family home. That just fed into our philosophy, Snyder said.
For more information, visit http://www.beachmetro.com/2013/11/20/music-lessons-offered-sliding-scale/